How it's done

 

Below is a basic overview of the key challenges that face us as thatchers and how they are dealt with in the correct way.

 

The Eaves:

Where there is a water reed roof, the eaves will be replaced; this reduces the weight and strain on your property as well as creating a better look from beneath. Where the material is wheat straw, the eaves will be replaced as required.

 

Timber Work:

If required, minor repairs to timber work will be undertaken by myself. If the timber work requires major repairs, I outsource to one of my preferred associates.

 

The Roof:

I always ensure one coat is stripped and replaced. Generally, I don’t thatch over the top of the existing water reed as this adds a considerable amount of weight which could damage your property, especially if it is a listed building and of age.

 

Finishing Off:

Once thatched with a ridge in your choice of style, I net the entire roof (wheat straw only) to help prevent rodent and bird damage. I generally don’t net water reed roofs as reed is much longer and due to the nature of the material there is nothing for rodents or birds to eat, unlike wheat straw which may have grain in it which the thrashing machine has not removed.  With water reed roofs I always net the ridge as that is constructed from wheat straw (it is more pliable).

 

I always finish the roof with a handmade (made by myself) straw finial of your choice.

 

A final clear and tidy up of the property is undertaken so that you can enjoy and admire your new roof.

 

The advantages of thatch

 

  • Provides one of the best natural insulation materials;
  • Gives good acoustic insulation, making extremely quiet living conditions;
  • A thatched roof will ensure the house is warm in the winter and cool in the summer, although the addition of loft insulation is also recommend;
  • Natural materials are more sustainable;
  • Thatch works well on irregular roof structures;
  • Thatch has an ecological advantage as it is produced in a natural process and the natural materials used in thatching are improved by regular harvesting.

 

Note: Most thatched properties that are listed must be thatched with the same material that was previously used.

 

Types of thatch

 

In the UK, the 3 most commonly used materials are long straw, combed wheat straw and water reed. The latter is mostly sourced from European countries, although there are small amounts of Norfolk reed available which normally remain in Norfolk.

 

Long Straw:

Long Straw is drum thrashed wheat straw prepared by hand. The straw is thrashed but not combed or combine harvested, and has a more ornate appearance with hazel spar work around the eaves to keep it secure. The average life-span of long straw is 15 to 20 years.

 

Combed Wheat Straw:

Combed Wheat Straw is drawn from the same source as that of long straw but differs in the harvesting stage. Wheat straw has been passed through a reed comber, a modification of a thrashing drum to mechanically straighten and clean out the unwanted flag. The finished bundle stands between 4ft tall and has clean butts at the bottom which gives the roof a smoother appearance. The average life-span of combed what straw is 25 to 30 years.

 

Water Reed:

Water Reed (Phragmites Australis), more generally known as Norfolk Reed, is a coarser material grown in the marshlands and stands much taller than wheat straw at approx. 5-7 ft. The average life-span of water reed is 25 to 40 years depending on the location and climatic conditions.

 

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

How it's done

 

Below is a basic overview of the key challenges that face us as thatchers and how they are dealt with in the correct way.

 

The Eaves:

Where there is a water reed roof, the eaves will be replaced; this reduces the weight and strain on your property as well as creating a better look from beneath. Where the material is wheat straw, the eaves will be replaced as required.

 

Timber Work:

If required, minor repairs to timber work will be undertaken by myself. If the timber work requires major repairs, I outsource to one of my preferred associates.

 

The Roof:

I always ensure one coat is stripped and replaced. Generally, I don’t thatch over the top of the existing water reed as this adds a considerable amount of weight which could damage your property, especially if it is a listed building and of age.

 

Finishing Off:

Once thatched with a ridge in your choice of style, I net the entire roof (wheat straw only) to help prevent rodent and bird damage. I generally don’t net water reed roofs as reed is much longer and due to the nature of the material there is nothing for rodents or birds to eat, unlike wheat straw which may have grain in it which the thrashing machine has not removed.  With water reed roofs I always net the ridge as that is constructed from wheat straw (it is more pliable).

 

I always finish the roof with a handmade (made by myself) straw finial of your choice.

 

A final clear and tidy up of the property is undertaken so that you can enjoy and admire your new roof.

 

The advantages of thatch

 

  • Provides one of the best natural insulation materials;
  • Gives good acoustic insulation, making extremely quiet living conditions;
  • A thatched roof will ensure the house is warm in the winter and cool in the summer, although the addition of loft insulation is also recommend;
  • Natural materials are more sustainable;
  • Thatch works well on irregular roof structures;
  • Thatch has an ecological advantage as it is produced in a natural process and the natural materials used in thatching are improved by regular harvesting.

 

Note: Most thatched properties that are listed must be thatched with the same material that was previously used.

 

Types of thatch

 

In the UK, the 3 most commonly used materials are long straw, combed wheat straw and water reed. The latter is mostly sourced from European countries, although there are small amounts of Norfolk reed available which normally remain in Norfolk.

 

Long Straw:

Long Straw is drum thrashed wheat straw prepared by hand. The straw is thrashed but not combed or combine harvested, and has a more ornate appearance with hazel spar work around the eaves to keep it secure. The average life-span of long straw is 15 to 20 years.

 

Combed Wheat Straw:

Combed Wheat Straw is drawn from the same source as that of long straw but differs in the harvesting stage. Wheat straw has been passed through a reed comber, a modification of a thrashing drum to mechanically straighten and clean out the unwanted flag. The finished bundle stands between 4ft tall and has clean butts at the bottom which gives the roof a smoother appearance. The average life-span of combed what straw is 25 to 30 years.

 

Water Reed:

Water Reed (Phragmites Australis), more generally known as Norfolk Reed, is a coarser material grown in the marshlands and stands much taller than wheat straw at approx. 5-7 ft. The average life-span of water reed is 25 to 40 years depending on the location and climatic conditions.

 

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

How it's done

 

Below is a basic overview of the key challenges that face us as thatchers and how they are dealt with in the correct way.

 

The Eaves:

Where there is a water reed roof, the eaves will be replaced; this reduces the weight and strain on your property as well as creating a better look from beneath. Where the material is wheat straw, the eaves will be replaced as required.

 

Timber Work:

If required, minor repairs to timber work will be undertaken by myself. If the timber work requires major repairs, I outsource to one of my preferred associates.

 

The Roof:

I always ensure one coat is stripped and replaced. Generally, I don’t thatch over the top of the existing water reed as this adds a considerable amount of weight which could damage your property, especially if it is a listed building and of age.

 

Finishing Off:

Once thatched with a ridge in your choice of style, I net the entire roof (wheat straw only) to help prevent rodent and bird damage. I generally don’t net water reed roofs as reed is much longer and due to the nature of the material there is nothing for rodents or birds to eat, unlike wheat straw which may have grain in it which the thrashing machine has not removed.  With water reed roofs I always net the ridge as that is constructed from wheat straw (it is more pliable).

 

I always finish the roof with a handmade (made by myself) straw finial of your choice.

 

A final clear and tidy up of the property is undertaken so that you can enjoy and admire your new roof.

 

The advantages of thatch

 

  • Provides one of the best natural insulation materials;
  • Gives good acoustic insulation, making extremely quiet living conditions;
  • A thatched roof will ensure the house is warm in the winter and cool in the summer, although the addition of loft insulation is also recommend;
  • Natural materials are more sustainable;
  • Thatch works well on irregular roof structures;
  • Thatch has an ecological advantage as it is produced in a natural process and the natural materials used in thatching are improved by regular harvesting.

 

Note: Most thatched properties that are listed must be thatched with the same material that was previously used.

 

Types of thatch

 

In the UK, the 3 most commonly used materials are long straw, combed wheat straw and water reed. The latter is mostly sourced from European countries, although there are small amounts of Norfolk reed available which normally remain in Norfolk.

 

Long Straw:

Long Straw is drum thrashed wheat straw prepared by hand. The straw is thrashed but not combed or combine harvested, and has a more ornate appearance with hazel spar work around the eaves to keep it secure. The average life-span of long straw is 15 to 20 years.

 

Combed Wheat Straw:

Combed Wheat Straw is drawn from the same source as that of long straw but differs in the harvesting stage. Wheat straw has been passed through a reed comber, a modification of a thrashing drum to mechanically straighten and clean out the unwanted flag. The finished bundle stands between 4ft tall and has clean butts at the bottom which gives the roof a smoother appearance. The average life-span of combed what straw is 25 to 30 years.

 

Water Reed:

Water Reed (Phragmites Australis), more generally known as Norfolk Reed, is a coarser material grown in the marshlands and stands much taller than wheat straw at approx. 5-7 ft. The average life-span of water reed is 25 to 40 years depending on the location and climatic conditions.

 

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

How it's done

 

Below is a basic overview of the key challenges that face us as thatchers and how they are dealt with in the correct way.

 

The Eaves:

Where there is a water reed roof, the eaves will be replaced; this reduces the weight and strain on your property as well as creating a better look from beneath. Where the material is wheat straw, the eaves will be replaced as required.

 

Timber Work:

If required, minor repairs to timber work will be undertaken by myself. If the timber work requires major repairs, I outsource to one of my preferred associates.

 

The Roof:

I always ensure one coat is stripped and replaced. Generally, I don’t thatch over the top of the existing water reed as this adds a considerable amount of weight which could damage your property, especially if it is a listed building and of age.

 

Finishing Off:

Once thatched with a ridge in your choice of style, I net the entire roof (wheat straw only) to help prevent rodent and bird damage. I generally don’t net water reed roofs as reed is much longer and due to the nature of the material there is nothing for rodents or birds to eat, unlike wheat straw which may have grain in it which the thrashing machine has not removed.  With water reed roofs I always net the ridge as that is constructed from wheat straw (it is more pliable).

 

I always finish the roof with a handmade (made by myself) straw finial of your choice.

 

A final clear and tidy up of the property is undertaken so that you can enjoy and admire your new roof.

 

The advantages of thatch

 

  • Provides one of the best natural insulation materials;
  • Gives good acoustic insulation, making extremely quiet living conditions;
  • A thatched roof will ensure the house is warm in the winter and cool in the summer, although the addition of loft insulation is also recommend;
  • Natural materials are more sustainable;
  • Thatch works well on irregular roof structures;
  • Thatch has an ecological advantage as it is produced in a natural process and the natural materials used in thatching are improved by regular harvesting.

 

Note: Most thatched properties that are listed must be thatched with the same material that was previously used.

 

Types of thatch

 

In the UK, the 3 most commonly used materials are long straw, combed wheat straw and water reed. The latter is mostly sourced from European countries, although there are small amounts of Norfolk reed available which normally remain in Norfolk.

 

Long Straw:

Long Straw is drum thrashed wheat straw prepared by hand. The straw is thrashed but not combed or combine harvested, and has a more ornate appearance with hazel spar work around the eaves to keep it secure. The average life-span of long straw is 15 to 20 years.

 

Combed Wheat Straw:

Combed Wheat Straw is drawn from the same source as that of long straw but differs in the harvesting stage. Wheat straw has been passed through a reed comber, a modification of a thrashing drum to mechanically straighten and clean out the unwanted flag. The finished bundle stands between 4ft tall and has clean butts at the bottom which gives the roof a smoother appearance. The average life-span of combed what straw is 25 to 30 years.

 

Water Reed:

Water Reed (Phragmites Australis), more generally known as Norfolk Reed, is a coarser material grown in the marshlands and stands much taller than wheat straw at approx. 5-7 ft. The average life-span of water reed is 25 to 40 years depending on the location and climatic conditions.

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 04583100

Registered address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13