The following are general terms associated with thatching.

 

Apron:

The layer of thatch directly beneath a window or chimney, often covered by an extra layer of thatch as a pad to protect the roof.

 

Arris Rail:

This is normally a triangular shaped piece of wood which is fixed to the outer edge of the wall plate to form a tilt for the thatch to sit on.

 

Brow/ Verge:

The edge of the thatched roof that overhangs the gable.

 

Base / Lower Coat:

This is the original layer of thatch that is often left in place when a roof is re-thatched. In particularly old properties there may be ‘smoke blackened’ thatch layers on the underside of the roof. This is protected due to its historic importance and must not be removed.

 

Block Cut Ridge:

This type of ridge stands proud of the main coat of the thatch. This type allows thatchers to decorate the ridge line in a personalised style. In many examples, it is possible to identify the individual thatcher by the ridge patterning.

 

Bundles:

This is a bundle of wheat straw.

 

Brow Course:

This is the first course up from the eaves formed by the bundles.

 

Coat-work:

This is the uppermost surface of the thatch. In the case of over-coating, a new layer of thatch is fixed to the existing undercoats and may not be the original material.

 

Crooks:

These are the steel nails used to fix the straw or reed to the roof timbers.

 

Cross Spars:

Lengths of split hazel used to decorate the ridge, eaves and gables of the finished thatch surface.

 

Dutchman:

This is a half rounded shape, similar to a leggett which is used to help form valleys.

 

Flashing:

Flashing is the lead or cement strip applied around chimneys and other protrusions of the roof for safety.

 

Flush Ridge:

This is a more traditional type of ridge and one that many planning offices are keen to return to. The ridge is finished flush with the coat layer of the main roof. There are two common ways of achieving this finish, butt-up ridges is where the two sides are merged at the roof. The other method is when a single layer is wrapped over to form the roofline.

 

Gulley:

This is a depression in the thatch which occurs when the thatch in a particular area deteriorates quicker than other areas.

 

Hip:

This is the ‘triangular’ shape at the end of the roof.

 

Leggett:

This is a tool that is used to dress the surface of the thatch to ensure an even finish.

 

Liggers:

Usually made from willow or hazel these are lengths of split wood that are used to hold the upper surface of the thatch in place. Once in position these fixtures perform the same job as sway rods but in a different position. In modern thatching these are used on long straw roofs to hold the eaves and verges. When a roof is re-thatched using water reed or combed wheat straw the use of these wooden strips is normally only used on the ridges.

 

Ridge Roll:

When a ridge level needs to be raised in order to get a sufficient pitch/ angle on the ridge, a ridge roll is used. This is a long tight ‘sausage’ shape roll of straw used to build up the height prior to the finishing layer.

 

Saddle:

This is the section at a junction between the main roof coat and a lower ridge.

 

Skirt:

This describes the layer of thatch out of which a pattern is cut in to. This may be either surrounding the chimney or run along a block ridge.

 

Spars:

Used to secure new thatch to older coats and liggers to the coat surface. They are lengths of willow or hazel which are pointed at each end and twisted into a U-shape; they work by holding down a ligger or a sway to the upper surface.

 

Sway:

Used to be made of hazel but more often than not nowadays it is made from galvanised rod or mild steel bar. They are used to secure the thatch to the roof.

 

Screw Fixings:

These are stainless steel wires with a screw attached to one end. They are used to secure the thatch down; their purpose is the same as that of a thatching crook.

 

Side Pins:

These are long metal crook shaped implements which are used to hold the thatch back on the end of a sway.

 

Wire Netting:

This is placed on the finished roof to protect from bird and rodent damage. It is not normally placed on water reed, however it will be placed on the ridge as that is made from wheat straw.

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

The following are general terms associated with thatching.

 

Apron:

The layer of thatch directly beneath a window or chimney, often covered by an extra layer of thatch as a pad to protect the roof.

 

Arris Rail:

This is normally a triangular shaped piece of wood which is fixed to the outer edge of the wall plate to form a tilt for the thatch to sit on.

 

Brow/ Verge:

The edge of the thatched roof that overhangs the gable.

 

Base / Lower Coat:

This is the original layer of thatch that is often left in place when a roof is re-thatched. In particularly old properties there may be ‘smoke blackened’ thatch layers on the underside of the roof. This is protected due to its historic importance and must not be removed.

 

Block Cut Ridge:

This type of ridge stands proud of the main coat of the thatch. This type allows thatchers to decorate the ridge line in a personalised style. In many examples, it is possible to identify the individual thatcher by the ridge patterning.

 

Bundles:

This is a bundle of wheat straw.

 

Brow Course:

This is the first course up from the eaves formed by the bundles.

 

Coat-work:

This is the uppermost surface of the thatch. In the case of over-coating, a new layer of thatch is fixed to the existing undercoats and may not be the original material.

 

Crooks:

These are the steel nails used to fix the straw or reed to the roof timbers.

 

Cross Spars:

Lengths of split hazel used to decorate the ridge, eaves and gables of the finished thatch surface.

 

Dutchman:

This is a half rounded shape, similar to a leggett which is used to help form valleys.

 

Flashing:

Flashing is the lead or cement strip applied around chimneys and other protrusions of the roof for safety.

 

Flush Ridge:

This is a more traditional type of ridge and one that many planning offices are keen to return to. The ridge is finished flush with the coat layer of the main roof. There are two common ways of achieving this finish, butt-up ridges is where the two sides are merged at the roof. The other method is when a single layer is wrapped over to form the roofline.

 

Gulley:

This is a depression in the thatch which occurs when the thatch in a particular area deteriorates quicker than other areas.

 

Hip:

This is the ‘triangular’ shape at the end of the roof.

 

Leggett:

This is a tool that is used to dress the surface of the thatch to ensure an even finish.

 

Liggers:

Usually made from willow or hazel these are lengths of split wood that are used to hold the upper surface of the thatch in place. Once in position these fixtures perform the same job as sway rods but in a different position. In modern thatching these are used on long straw roofs to hold the eaves and verges. When a roof is re-thatched using water reed or combed wheat straw the use of these wooden strips is normally only used on the ridges.

 

Ridge Roll:

When a ridge level needs to be raised in order to get a sufficient pitch/ angle on the ridge, a ridge roll is used. This is a long tight ‘sausage’ shape roll of straw used to build up the height prior to the finishing layer.

 

Saddle:

This is the section at a junction between the main roof coat and a lower ridge.

 

Skirt:

This describes the layer of thatch out of which a pattern is cut in to. This may be either surrounding the chimney or run along a block ridge.

 

Spars:

Used to secure new thatch to older coats and liggers to the coat surface. They are lengths of willow or hazel which are pointed at each end and twisted into a U-shape; they work by holding down a ligger or a sway to the upper surface.

 

Sway:

Used to be made of hazel but more often than not nowadays it is made from galvanised rod or mild steel bar. They are used to secure the thatch to the roof.

 

Screw Fixings:

These are stainless steel wires with a screw attached to one end. They are used to secure the thatch down; their purpose is the same as that of a thatching crook.

 

Side Pins:

These are long metal crook shaped implements which are used to hold the thatch back on the end of a sway.

 

Wire Netting:

This is placed on the finished roof to protect from bird and rodent damage. It is not normally placed on water reed, however it will be placed on the ridge as that is made from wheat straw.

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

The following are general terms associated with thatching.

 

Apron:

The layer of thatch directly beneath a window or chimney, often covered by an extra layer of thatch as a pad to protect the roof.

 

Arris Rail:

This is normally a triangular shaped piece of wood which is fixed to the outer edge of the wall plate to form a tilt for the thatch to sit on.

 

Brow/ Verge:

The edge of the thatched roof that overhangs the gable.

 

Base / Lower Coat:

This is the original layer of thatch that is often left in place when a roof is re-thatched. In particularly old properties there may be ‘smoke blackened’ thatch layers on the underside of the roof. This is protected due to its historic importance and must not be removed.

 

Block Cut Ridge:

This type of ridge stands proud of the main coat of the thatch. This type allows thatchers to decorate the ridge line in a personalised style. In many examples, it is possible to identify the individual thatcher by the ridge patterning.

 

Bundles:

This is a bundle of wheat straw.

 

Brow Course:

This is the first course up from the eaves formed by the bundles.

 

Coat-work:

This is the uppermost surface of the thatch. In the case of over-coating, a new layer of thatch is fixed to the existing undercoats and may not be the original material.

 

Crooks:

These are the steel nails used to fix the straw or reed to the roof timbers.

 

Cross Spars:

Lengths of split hazel used to decorate the ridge, eaves and gables of the finished thatch surface.

 

Dutchman:

This is a half rounded shape, similar to a leggett which is used to help form valleys.

 

Flashing:

Flashing is the lead or cement strip applied around chimneys and other protrusions of the roof for safety.

 

Flush Ridge:

This is a more traditional type of ridge and one that many planning offices are keen to return to. The ridge is finished flush with the coat layer of the main roof. There are two common ways of achieving this finish, butt-up ridges is where the two sides are merged at the roof. The other method is when a single layer is wrapped over to form the roofline.

 

Gulley:

This is a depression in the thatch which occurs when the thatch in a particular area deteriorates quicker than other areas.

 

Hip:

This is the ‘triangular’ shape at the end of the roof.

 

Leggett:

This is a tool that is used to dress the surface of the thatch to ensure an even finish.

 

Liggers:

Usually made from willow or hazel these are lengths of split wood that are used to hold the upper surface of the thatch in place. Once in position these fixtures perform the same job as sway rods but in a different position. In modern thatching these are used on long straw roofs to hold the eaves and verges. When a roof is re-thatched using water reed or combed wheat straw the use of these wooden strips is normally only used on the ridges.

 

Ridge Roll:

When a ridge level needs to be raised in order to get a sufficient pitch/ angle on the ridge, a ridge roll is used. This is a long tight ‘sausage’ shape roll of straw used to build up the height prior to the finishing layer.

 

Saddle:

This is the section at a junction between the main roof coat and a lower ridge.

 

Skirt:

This describes the layer of thatch out of which a pattern is cut in to. This may be either surrounding the chimney or run along a block ridge.

 

Spars:

Used to secure new thatch to older coats and liggers to the coat surface. They are lengths of willow or hazel which are pointed at each end and twisted into a U-shape; they work by holding down a ligger or a sway to the upper surface.

 

Sway:

Used to be made of hazel but more often than not nowadays it is made from galvanised rod or mild steel bar. They are used to secure the thatch to the roof.

 

Screw Fixings:

These are stainless steel wires with a screw attached to one end. They are used to secure the thatch down; their purpose is the same as that of a thatching crook.

 

Side Pins:

These are long metal crook shaped implements which are used to hold the thatch back on the end of a sway.

 

Wire Netting:

This is placed on the finished roof to protect from bird and rodent damage. It is not normally placed on water reed, however it will be placed on the ridge as that is made from wheat straw.

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company number 04583100

Registered Company address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13

The following are general terms associated with thatching.

 

Apron:

The layer of thatch directly beneath a window or chimney, often covered by an extra layer of thatch as a pad to protect the roof.

 

Arris Rail:

This is normally a triangular shaped piece of wood which is fixed to the outer edge of the wall plate to form a tilt for the thatch to sit on.

 

Brow/ Verge:

The edge of the thatched roof that overhangs the gable.

 

Base / Lower Coat:

This is the original layer of thatch that is often left in place when a roof is re-thatched. In particularly old properties there may be ‘smoke blackened’ thatch layers on the underside of the roof. This is protected due to its historic importance and must not be removed.

 

Block Cut Ridge:

This type of ridge stands proud of the main coat of the thatch. This type allows thatchers to decorate the ridge line in a personalised style. In many examples, it is possible to identify the individual thatcher by the ridge patterning.

 

Bundles:

This is a bundle of wheat straw.

 

Brow Course:

This is the first course up from the eaves formed by the bundles.

 

Coat-work:

This is the uppermost surface of the thatch. In the case of over-coating, a new layer of thatch is fixed to the existing undercoats and may not be the original material.

 

Crooks:

These are the steel nails used to fix the straw or reed to the roof timbers.

 

Cross Spars:

Lengths of split hazel used to decorate the ridge, eaves and gables of the finished thatch surface.

 

Dutchman:

This is a half rounded shape, similar to a leggett which is used to help form valleys.

 

Flashing:

Flashing is the lead or cement strip applied around chimneys and other protrusions of the roof for safety.

 

Flush Ridge:

This is a more traditional type of ridge and one that many planning offices are keen to return to. The ridge is finished flush with the coat layer of the main roof. There are two common ways of achieving this finish, butt-up ridges is where the two sides are merged at the roof. The other method is when a single layer is wrapped over to form the roofline.

 

Gulley:

This is a depression in the thatch which occurs when the thatch in a particular area deteriorates quicker than other areas.

 

Hip:

This is the ‘triangular’ shape at the end of the roof.

 

Leggett:

This is a tool that is used to dress the surface of the thatch to ensure an even finish.

 

Liggers:

Usually made from willow or hazel these are lengths of split wood that are used to hold the upper surface of the thatch in place. Once in position these fixtures perform the same job as sway rods but in a different position. In modern thatching these are used on long straw roofs to hold the eaves and verges. When a roof is re-thatched using water reed or combed wheat straw the use of these wooden strips is normally only used on the ridges.

 

Ridge Roll:

When a ridge level needs to be raised in order to get a sufficient pitch/ angle on the ridge, a ridge roll is used. This is a long tight ‘sausage’ shape roll of straw used to build up the height prior to the finishing layer.

 

Saddle:

This is the section at a junction between the main roof coat and a lower ridge.

 

Skirt:

This describes the layer of thatch out of which a pattern is cut in to. This may be either surrounding the chimney or run along a block ridge.

 

Spars:

Used to secure new thatch to older coats and liggers to the coat surface. They are lengths of willow or hazel which are pointed at each end and twisted into a U-shape; they work by holding down a ligger or a sway to the upper surface.

 

Sway:

Used to be made of hazel but more often than not nowadays it is made from galvanised rod or mild steel bar. They are used to secure the thatch to the roof.

 

Screw Fixings:

These are stainless steel wires with a screw attached to one end. They are used to secure the thatch down; their purpose is the same as that of a thatching crook.

 

Side Pins:

These are long metal crook shaped implements which are used to hold the thatch back on the end of a sway.

 

Wire Netting:

This is placed on the finished roof to protect from bird and rodent damage. It is not normally placed on water reed, however it will be placed on the ridge as that is made from wheat straw.

Thatchcraft Limited is registered in England and Wales under Company No. 04583100

Registered address: The Senate, Southerhay Gardens, Exeter, Devon EX1 1UG

VAT number: 307 3670 13